Argynnis adippe

High Brown Fritillary

euroButterflies

by Matt Rowlings

copyright © 2003-2016

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Photo: adippe

Valais, Switzerland, June 2015

Photo: adippe

Valais, Switzerland, September 2010

Field notes and information

A widespread and often common species across much of Europe. Very rare and seriously threatened in the UK due to habitat pressures and changing woodland management regimes.

Identification & Similar species: Separated from the niobe fritillary A. niobe by the shape of the margin of the forewing which is staight or slightly concave vs rounded/ convex. On the underside, it usually lacks a black pupil in the underside hindwing basal spot and the veins are not lined black as in the niobe fritillary A. niobe . This latter feature holds true in the pale forms A. niobe f. eris & A,. adippe f. cleodoxa. Replaced in north Africa by the Moroccan high brown fritillary, A. auresianna.

Distribution & Flight: Europe, absent from most of the UK and northern Scandinavia. Single brooded flying in June/ July and into August.

Habitat & Behaviour: Clearings in open woodland and bushes. Frequently feeds on thistles, knapweeds and similar flowers. Also takes salts from mud.

Variation: Two forms are named depending on the decreasing extent of the green basal area on the underside hindwing: chlorodippe & cleodippe. The form cleodoxa has an overall sandy underside, lacking the reflective spots.

Photo: adippe

SW Serbia, June 2012

Photo: adippePhoto: adippe

Sierra Nevada, Spain, July 2013

Photo: adippe

Granada, Spain, July 2013

Photo: adippe

Valais, Switzerland, August 2013

Photo: adippe

SW Serbia, June 2012

Photo: adippe

Hautes Alpes, France, August 2012

An aberration, the black markings are merged together.

Photo: adippe

Hautes Alpes, France, August 2012

Photo: adippe

Hautes Alpes, France, August 2012

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Var, France, July 2010

Photo: adippe

Valais, Switzerland, June 2011

Photo: adippe

Valais, Switzerland, August 2007

Female.