A website dedicated to European Butterflies


Contact Me
Matt Rowlings

 

Home
Search-Scientific
Search-English
What's New
Checklist 2012
Flowers & Orchids
Links
Lepidapp
Cameras
Books etc

 
All contents and photographs copyright Matt Rowlings, ©2003-2011.
 
Photos: explicit permission must be obtained from Matt Rowlings for any use of any images from eurobutterflies.com.


           
       RSS Feed

Click here for the option to "subscribe" (it's free) to the eurobutterflies RSS Feed for the latest on what's flying and butterfly related news.

 

Hyponephele lupina

Oriental Meadow Brown

Field Notes

Previous Next

 

Var, France, August 2010

From late morning the butterflies hid in the trees.

 

Bouches du Rhône, France, August 2010

 

Var, France, August 2010

These could be M. jurtina, but more likely they are H. lupina.

 

NW Greece, August 2008

 

Crete, Greece, June 2004

Found dead at road side. Clearly shows distinctive broad scent brand
and deeply scalloped hindwing.

 

Crete, Greece, June 2004

 

Montes Universales, Spain, August 2003

 

Montes Universales, Spain, August 2003

 

Montes Universales, Spain, August 2003

 

Montes Universales, Spain, August 2003

 

Montes Universales, Spain, August 2003

This one isn't flying anyway - the crab spider caught it
as it fed from this flower.

 


There are three species of Meadow Brown that have often caused me difficulties in identification. Usually this was because I only ever find by far the most common of the three - the Meadow Brown, Maniola jurtina. The fact that this is probably the commonest of all European butterflies doesn't help. First impressions do help though. The current species and the Dusky Meadow Brown, Hyponephele lycaon are actually rather dull yellow, grey and dark brown butterflies. By contrast, jurtina has bright orange markings and warm brown coloration. The upperside markings of lycaon and lupina are fairly constant in my experience and match the illustrations in Tolman closely. The undersides of these two species are finely mottled grey and fairly uniform in colour density. Again jurtina differs by being very variable in all aspects and the underside has a distinct pale post discal band often with orange towards the east.

This species and lycaon differ from one another in size. The upperside markings are also distinct. Comparing the sexes lycaon is always much brighter and with extensive (although not always bright) yellowy orange markings. The much darker, grey brown of lupina is quite distinct. The current species also has heavily scalloped hindwings compared to lycaon and jurtina.

I've found lupina only occasionally. Of course I may have encountered it more frequently than I think on account of its similarity to jurtina. The Montes Universales of central Spain seems to be a good area to find it although in early August it was passed its best and never more and a two or three at one site. Elsewhere it is found in SE France, parts of Italy and SE Europe. In SE Europe the form rhamnussia flies which has a much richer chestnut brown upperside than the nominate form.

 

TOP